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EU: No caffeine advertising on energy drinks


EU Parliament stops health claims
"We don't want to ban energy drinks," says Christel Schaldemose, Danish rapporteur to the EU Parliament. "We don't mind that people drink these drinks either." There are, however, many reasons why the sweet caffeine spray should not contain any health claims about caffeine.

The EU Parliament therefore asked the EU Commission on July 7, 2016 to withdraw a draft regulation. Manufacturers of caffeine-containing beverages should be able to advertise in the future that caffeine increases alertness or concentration. Parliament doubts that this is actually a positive health effect. The list of reasons for rejection is tough. According to the requirements of the Health Claims Ordinance, there should actually be no health claims on foods that have a low health value. So far, however, the Commission has failed to define what low health value is. According to Parliament, energy drinks are definitely one of them: With their high sugar content, they can contribute to weight gain.

But not only that: Young people are the largest group of energy drink consumers. Over 68 percent of European adolescents and 18 percent of children drink it regularly. A quarter of adolescents even drink three or more doses at a time. There is no age control for sales. A connection with headache, sleep problems and behavioral problems can be observed in the case of high consumers.

Health advertising would rather promote the consumption of such drinks among children and adolescents, it says in the rejection reasons of the EU parliament. "We shouldn't be playing with children's health," says Schaldemose. Advertising information on the psychological effects of caffeine should therefore not appear on the cans. With this decision, the Commission proposal is off the table. The signal is also a clear sign to the manufacturers. Because according to Schaldemose, they were already looking forward to further sales growth.

However, it remains to be seen whether the veto can curb the consumption of energy drinks. As early as 2014, scientists from the World Health Organization discovered that the mix of aggressive advertising and sales promotions could pose a serious threat to public health. Advertising is primarily aimed at young people in a less regulated environment.

(aid) - "We don't want to ban energy drinks," says Christel Schaldemose, Danish rapporteur to the EU Parliament. "We don't mind that people drink these drinks either." There are, however, many reasons why the sweet caffeine spray should not contain any health claims about caffeine.

The EU Parliament therefore called on the 7th. Advertising is primarily aimed at young people in a less regulated environment.

The prevention officer of the Association for Resident Pediatric Cardiologists e. V., Dr. Martin Hulpke-Wette, assumes that a certain percentage of young energy drink users already have undetected heart damage. He has so far not noticed because this group is usually not examined by pediatric cardiologists, the doctor suspects. So far there have been no studies on it. Gesa Maschkowski, aid

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Video: WHY u0026 HOW I Quit CAFFEINE! Energy Drinks (November 2021).